Resources

Del Campo School

Del Campo School, Honduras

Social-emotional Learning and Strategies to help all Learners.

George Couros chats with Sara Westbrook

Sara Westbrook, creator of UPower Presentations, a motivational speaker, author & singer who specializes in resilience, confidence, and emotional and mental well-being joins George Couros on this episode of The Innovator's Mindset Podcast! The two talk social-emotional learning and strategies to help all learners. Sara shares some great analogies that help us connect life events to the emotions we feel - including one that George joking says is going to be the namesake for this episode: Chocolate Milk and Your Emotions. Check out the full podcast for some of Sara's great strategies and ideas for supporting all learners in any learning environment.

  • podcasts & webinars
  • social-emotional learning
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"When was the last time you were validated?"

A conversation with George Couros and Dean Shareski

 Dean Shareski and George Couros dig into deeper and more meaningful topics within education - like how to find joy in education in any learning environment. Dean's Twitter bio is a fitting description of this episode: "Working daily to reduce my ignorance. Concurrently trying to identify and linger in delight." In this episode, you will learn more about how Dean is creating hope and joy for all learners and how he answers George's question about how we can help people feel valued. Dean also shares a strategy that he uses to better understand how educators feel validated.

  • podcasts & webinars
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How to Stop Cheating in Remote Learning

By Ray Bendici 

To stop cheating in remote learning, educators need to consider creating a nurturing environment and embracing a growth mindset.

Trying to eliminate cheating in remote learning continues to be a daunting challenge for educators. From lockdown browsers to live proctoring, technical solutions abound to help keep students on the straight and narrow. Changing the approach to remote learning and assessments can also help reduce cheating.  

  • assessment
  • remote teaching
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Strategies for Working Efficiently When Teaching Online

Teaching in distance and hybrid models is time-consuming, so teachers need to make sure they use their time well.

By Kasey Short

Teaching in a hybrid in-person/remote model requires significantly more planning than teaching in the traditional classroom model. Tasks that were once quick, such as monitoring students’ progress during class and following up on late and missing assignments, have become laborious, and everyday activities like making sure that students have access to material from the school library and determining the best technology tools to meet students’ needs take a tremendous amount of planning. More than ever, it’s important that I use my time efficiently and allow myself time to recharge.

  • remote teaching
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Learning That Works for the Learner

by George Couros

With all of the struggles with remote learning, I have noticed that when I sit in on sessions, I often turn my camera off, pull out my guitar and strum and pick slowly while I take in information. My hands move back and forth between the guitar, writing notes on paper, and ideas on a Google doc.  I turn the camera off for two reasons; I don’t want to distract anyone with my movement, and I also am not sure that playing guitar on a zoom call would look like I am paying attention and may be frowned upon during that time.

  • remote learning
  • remote teaching
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How Keeping a Pandemic Journal Builds Students’ Historical Thinking Skills and Helps Them Cope

Once per week, Shaw’s students email him pictures from their journals. At first, students focused on the pandemic’s immediate effects on their lives. Seniors, for example, wondered, “Am I gonna come back to school? Am I gonna graduate?” As weeks passed, entries reflected students’ growing recognition that they were part of a bigger story. That’s where those historical thinking skills started to appear. They pondered causes and consequences of politicians’ decisions and analyzed their personal experiences as part of socio-political systems. “The students are thinking about their day-to-day in the larger context of the world, which is pretty cool to watch,” Shaw said.

  • remote teaching
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Important Lessons Learned During the Pandemic and How They Can Drive Needed Change

by Eric Sheninger

There is no shortage of challenges that have been leveled on schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. After some time, we have seen an initial move to all remote learning, depending on where you live, a shift to some sort of hybrid model.  A spike in cases has led to buildings being closed again and a resumption of remote learning in some locations.  Uncertainty and a lack of continuity have had a heavy toll on teachers, administrators, students, and parents. 

As educators continue to grapple with these challenges, lessons have materialized that can pave the way for needed change. Even though it is difficult at the moment to provide the time and energy to focus on these, it is essential to begin to lay the foundation. One day the pandemic will be over. Education can ill afford to revert back to the way things were done in many districts and schools. If the pandemic has taught us one major lesson, it’s that the system has not worked for many learners. The time is now to seize on the opportunity to do something about it while it is fresh on everyone’s minds.  

  • remote teaching
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Leaning on Habits of Mind in Times of Fear and Uncertainty

By Dr. Nick Bruski

“The Easter Bunny came! He took a responsible risk!” (heard from a 3rd grade student)

The Institute for the Habits of Mind has a vision, “To create a more thoughtful, cooperative, compassionate generation of people who skillfully work to resolve social, environmental, economic and political problems.” Just over two years ago the Montecito community was faced with disaster as the combination of the Thomas Fire and Debris flow devastated our community and forced us to build a remote school from scratch without access to our physical building and community. With a strong foundation in the Habits of Mind, our community learned countless lessons that we hope will help usher us through the new challenges our planet is now facing. As we are asked to stay home, socially distance, and go to school remotely, there is no better time to embrace the Habits of Mind vision. Our world is full of new social, environmental and political problems for our children, families, schools, and communities to solve. More than ever we need a thoughtful, cooperative and compassionate society to get us through this time.

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